Toxic exposure on Army bases sparks battle for health benefits

A Vet 4 Vets | Veterans Disability Lawyer / Attorney – Army. – TOXIC EXPOSURES. Vietnam veterans may be eligible for compensation and health care for certain diseases associated with Agent Orange, the defoliant sprayed to unmask enemy hiding places in the jungles throughout Vietnam. Special health care and compensation benefits are available to the 2.6 million men and women who served in Vietnam between 1962.

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Fort McClellan’s toxic exposure history is long and involved outside industry as well as the US Army’s own chemical, biological, and radiological materials. Starting in the 1920s, Fort McClellan and Anniston, AL, were home to polychlorinated biphenyls (pcbs), mace, tear gas, mustard gas, white phosphorus, Cobalt (Co-60), uranium, plutonium.

The Military & Dependent Environmental Hazard Group is open to all military and family members who have been exposed to toxins while living on the over 130 military bases that are on the EPA Superfund List of contaminated bases here in the U.S. alone.

Cheyenne VA to host VA2K for Homeless Veterans

What are PFAS and why are they in drinking water? Toxic exposure on Army bases sparks battle for health. – But of the 12,378 burn pit disability claims filed between June 2007 and last March 31, only 20 percent (2,425) were granted VA disability benefits. After 9/11, open pits were the predominant method of waste disposal on Iraq and Afghanistan military bases. A wide range of items, including paint, petroleum, rubber and food waste, were burned.

Read about the types of service that may have resulted in exposure to certain hazards. Asbestos If you served served in any of the following military occupation specialties may have been exposed to asbestos: mining, milling, shipyard work, insulation work, demolition of old buildings, carpentry, construction, or manufacturing and installation of products such as flooring and roofing.

More than a dozen veterans advocacy groups will join forces to track and highlight toxic exposure illnesses among former military members in an attempt to push for quicker action on what they see.

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S.P: The U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs (SCVA) has been a wonderful supporter of those exposed to toxic chemicals while living and/or serving on military bases. But this type of needless.